Research Paper Funny Meme Pictures

The Success Kid, Bad Luck Brian and Overly Attached Girlfriend are all well-known memes, but what makes them more popular than others?

To find out, researchers designed software to predict which humorous images are more likely to be succeed and why.

According to their results, shorter memes gain more internet fame and those with swear words are the least likely to be shared.

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The Success Kid (pictured), Bad Luck Brian and Overly Attached Girlfriend are all well-known memes, but makes them more popular than others? Researchers used machine learning models to predict which humorous images are more likely to be succeed and why

In their study, researchers Keith Shubeck and Stephanie Huette from the University of Memphis, collaborated to understand the science behind memes.

'Our understanding of meme propagation runs parallel with our understanding of human culture', the researchers wrote. .

'The more we understand about memes and their mutations, their origins, and how quickly these are accepted by other individuals, the more we will understand cultural trends that may have been previously considered bewilderingly anomalous.'

The term 'meme' was coined by Richard Dawkins in 1979, who used it to describe a unit for carrying cultural ideas or behavior, similar to how genes carry genetic information from one generation to the next.

The meme was created long before the internet, it actually became popular during World War II as graffiti on walls.

This meme started when Reddit user Jeff Davis, who was 16 at the time , found a Polaroid taken by Maggie's friend Kaelyn, on a publicly visible Facebook album, and posted it on a thread titled: 'Just a book owners smile'

TOP 10 MOST POPULAR MEMES OF ALL TIME

Top 10 memes from left to right

1. Overly Attached Girlfriend

2. My Dinner Is More Important Than Your Dinner

3. We All Knew That One Girl...

4. Would Someone Please Feed This Adorable Cat?

5. The Chemistry Cat

6. Chuck Norris is Better Than You

7. Photobombing Squirrel

8. Smartest Woman Ever...

9. The Most Interesting Man Alive 

10. That's One Grumpy Cat 

Source: Inbound Marketing 

'Kilroy was here',  the text read next to a bald headed man, with a prominent nose, peeking over a wall with the little fingers hanging on to what looks like a wall was the start of the memes.

Shubeck and Heutte understood that in order to find what kind of memes draw the most attention the first step was developing robust and valid methods for detecting memes, tracking their mutations and predicting their success.

The machine learning system analyzed psycholinguistic features, physical features, orthographical features and meme type.

Such as the length, concreteness and emotional arousal.

The researchers selected 268 memes from knowyourmeme.com and fed them through linguistic analysis tools to learn more about the number of linguistic features, as Scott Shank summarizes in his article 'What Makes Memes Popular? The Science of Memes'.

They also tracked other features such as swear words and purposeful misspellings.

Then, they ran the memes into a neural network that learned how these features correlated with success, defined as 37,400 or more verbatim Google search results.

The meme was created long before the internet, it actually became popular during World War II as graffiti on walls. 'Kilroy was here', the text read next to a bald headed man, with a prominent nose, peeking over a wall with the little fingers hanging on to what looks like a wall was the start of the memes 

The model used a network that was designed to take the features as inputs and label them as either successful or unsuccessful.

Although the study indicates that the work is still in early stages, it was able to predict success with 80 per cent accuracy when exposed to new memes.

For example, the model correctly predicted the success of the meme 'Banana for scale.'

The meme is short and includes the concrete word 'banana'.

It also predicated the success of the meme 'Does this look like a face of mercy', another example with a concrete word.

Shubeck admits there is an element of mystery to how the variables interact, but they did find a few predictors that were statistically significant in determining success.

WHERE DO MEMES COMES FROM? 

Meme, a term first coined by Richard Dawkins, is a cultural idea, be it fashion, technology, or ideology that self-replicated and spreads among the people.

Often compared to genes and evolution, a meme can experience variation and mutation; they can become extinct r they can evolve with society.

An online meme, on the other hand, is an idea that spreads quickly via the internet.

At its most basic, an Internet meme is simply the propagation of a digital file or hyperlink from one person to others using methods available through the Internet.

The content often consists of a saying or joke, a rumor, an altered or original image, a complete website, a video clip or animation, or an offbeat news story, among many other possibilities.

In simple terms, an Internet meme is an inside joke, that a large number of Internet users are in on.

An Internet meme may stay the same or may evolve over time, by chance or through commentary, imitations, and parody versions, or even by collecting news accounts about itself. Internet memes have a tendency to evolve and spread extremely swiftly, sometimes going in and out of popularity in just days.

They are spread organically, voluntarily, and peer to peer, rather than by compulsion, predetermined path, or completely automated means.

The term Meme was coined by Richard Dawkins in his 1976 popular science bestseller, The Selfish Gene.

Shorter memes were 2.8 times more likely to be successful and template memes were 2.2 times more likely.

What surprised researchers the most was memes that had swear words were 1.77 times less likely to be successful.

'We were a little surprised,' Huette says, 'but then figured that people communicating with friends and family may not want to use taboo words.'

One of the promising aspects of this work is the fact that machine learning models can find a balance between multiple factors.

Although there isn't one feature that can determine the success of a meme, the models were able to learn how several elements can improve the meme's chances of fame.

The system predicated the success of the meme 'Does this look like a face of mercy', which has an example of a concrete word, in this case 'mercy'

Bad Luck Brian (pictured). A similar study was publish in 2012, by post-doctoral researcher at Harvard and Northeastern Universities, Oren Tsur. This study looked at makes certain hashtags on Twitter more popular than others. Tsur's worked revealed the importance of orthographic differences

A similar study was publish in 2012, by post-doctoral researcher at Harvard and Northeastern Universities, Oren Tsur.

This study looked at makes certain hashtags on Twitter more popular than others.

Tsur's worked revealed the importance of orthographic differences, such as capitalization to explain, for instance, why the hashtag #saveTheNHS was more popular than #savethenhs, despite the extra physical effort of typing capital letters.

'People are lazy and want to use the simplest hashtag,' Tsur explained.

'On the other hand, if a hashtag is all lower case, it is too hard to read.'

'We don't know what people prefer, but the algorithm finds a balance.' 

The model correctly predicted the success of the meme 'Banana for scale.' The meme is short and includes the concrete word 'banana'

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Every now and then it’s nice to take a break from heavy posts!

We’ve created some of these memes ourselves, while others I’ve found on the net. Not all are strictly memes, but if it’s funny I’ve put  it in!

I’m sure I’m missing some funny ones, so let me know in the comments below what your favourite vaping memes are!

1. My precious ejuice!

Do you ever feel like this when you are running out of juice!

This meme was inspired by:

2. That Moment When You Take A Dry Hit

We took this photo when writing 14 common clearomiser mistakes and solutions. Dan bravely volunteered for the photo – and it seemed perfect for a meme!

3. Doge Vaping Meme

Nothing to do with me – Emily adapted this meme to Eliquid!

5. Anti-Freeze Meme

I believe this one refers to the claim (not often repeated now) that propylene glycol, one of the ingredients in ecigs, is an anti-freeze. (It is used as an anti-freeze – in drinking water.) Diethylene glycol was also found in 1 eliquid – see the full story here.

6. My Vape Was On That Death Star

Well, wouldn’t you be upset?

7. Game of Ohms

Created, I believe, by Dudamis on Reddit!

8. How I Vape

Is this you too?

9. ECig Perceptions

An oldie, but a good one!

10. FDA Meme

11. Join the resistance

One of my favourites!

12. Wonder why your ecig keeps disappearing?

13, Ecigs kill… tobacco company’s profits

If anyone knows who created this, let me know!

14: Warning: Not everyone will appreciate it when you whip out personal electronic nicotine inhalation system…

15. Speed Dating: Vaper Style

16. Morpheus Vaping Meme

What if I told you… there was no variable wattage.

17. TPD/Vaping Meme

As Professor Etter said:

“This phenomenon is just too large, and you cannot stop a tsunami just by waving a piece of paper. Unregulated products will be sold on the black market, which will be worse than the current situation (see what happens with illicit drugs).”

18. Game Of Thrones

This ones refers to an old anti-vaping argument, which argued that e-cigs contained anti-freeze. Sometimes this referred to propylene glycol, which is used as a non-toxic anti-freeze in drinking water! Several years ago, one e-cig (out of 16 tested) was also found to have traces of diethylene glycol (see here for more info).

19. You Want Sub-Ohms?

Can you handle sub-ohms?

20. Time to cut back on menthol?

21. Vape Mail!

22. That feeling you you get when you spot another vaper…

23. That feeling when you find your new favourite juice

24. That atomiser with that battery!

25. I don’t always vape…

26. Vaping Science Meme

This was a brilliant meme we found on twitter, which was shared shortly after anti-vapers attacked the Public Health England after they endorsed ecigs as being at least 95% safer than tobacco cigarettes.

You can find all these memes and more on our pinterest board:

Follow The Smoker’s Angel’s board Vaping Memes on Pinterest.

Leave a link to your favourite meme in the comments!

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